THE HELSINKI WORLD ORDER: WHAT’S LEFT?

The crisis of international security arrangements is gradually getting deeper. It generates risks on every scale: bilateral, regional, and global. Revisionism and geopolitical offensive are on the rise. Protracted conflicts all over the world are getting more dangerous. Under such downbeat conditions, discussions are underway about the contours of a possible new world order. Some of its features are well-known. They hark back to the times of the Cold War, in particular to an attempt of stabilizing the international system in the 1970s, undertaken in Helsinki with the Conference on Security and Co-operation in Europe. This article examines some of the key principles of Helsinki’s Final Act and the ways they fit current international developments.

The crisis of international security arrangements is gradually getting deeper. It generates risks on every scale: bilateral, regional, and global. Revisionism and geopolitical offensive are on the rise. Protracted conflicts all over the world are getting more dangerous. Under such downbeat conditions, discussions are underway about the contours of a possible new world order. Some of its features are well-known. They hark back to the times of the Cold War, in particular to an attempt of stabilizing the international system in the 1970s, undertaken in Helsinki with the Conference on Security and Co-operation in Europe. This article examines some of the key principles of Helsinki’s Final Act and the ways they fit current international developments.
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Mykola Kapitonenko

Mykola Kapitonenko is an Associate Professor at the Institute of International Relations of Kyiv National Taras Shevchenko University. He is also a Director to the Centre of International Studies, an NGO, specializing at regional security studies and foreign policy of Ukraine. He has also been invited as a visiting professor to the University of Iowa, and was teaching at the Diplomatic Academy of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine. Mykola’s main research focus is in conflict studies and Ukrainian foreign policy. He’s been managing a number of analytical projects, and he’s an author of a textbook on international conflict studies, a monograph on power factor in international politics, and more than 60 articles on various foreign policy and security issues


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